Should I Receive Money for Pain and Suffering Under South Carolina's Workers' Compensation Laws?

Pain and suffering - along with financial anxiety - often result from on the job injuries. And while you should receive medical care, payment for time missed from work, mileage reimbursements, and compensation for any permanent disability, South Carolina's workers' comp laws do not allow money for any of your other losses. In other words, workers' comp does not pay for pain and suffering....at least not directly.

However, your physical pain is an indication that you may require additional medical treatment or that you may be suffering from a permanent injury. Workers' compensation cases are often decided by the medical records. It is therefore critical that you tell your doctors and therapists about every issue caused by the work injury. So long as the medical providers know that you are in pain, struggling with lost range of motion, and unable to perform the same duties as before the accident - yet doing your best to recover - the medical records ought to provide the evidence necessary to achieve a fair financial result. You should never exaggerate your pain levels or limitations, but you must be honest and thorough when the doctor asks, "How are you doing?" In this way, workers' comp will not provide direct payment for your pain and suffering, though your ailments will make their way into the medical charts, which in turn lead to a better settlement at the end of your case.

Insurance adjusters and nurse case managers cannot be trusted. Rather than listening to them when it comes to questions regarding how much money you should received from your claim, contact an experienced workers' comp attorney for a free case evaluation, as well as free books written for injured South Carolinians. You can reach me today at 803-790-2800.  

Kenneth Berger
Columbia South Carolina attorney dedicated to securing justice by helping the truly injured