Three Things You Should Know About South Carolina Burn Injury Cases

In meeting South Carolina burn victims, seeing their scars, and learning about their lives, I am always amazed by their resilience. It is for them, their families, and all other burn victims in search of answers and justice that I offer the following:

1. Every person or business that caused your burn injury may be held responsible.

Oftentimes, more than one defendant is to blame for the fire, chemical leak, or overheated piece of equipment that causes a burn. For example, a hotel fire may be the result of flammable furniture, defective smoke detectors, and a lack of sprinklers. In such a case, the furniture manufacturer, smoke detector company, and hotel might all be liable for a guest’s burn injuries. 

2. Burn victims are allowed compensation for all damages.

Some losses are obvious, such as past medical expenses and lost income. Likewise, some of the harms caused by a burn accident are undeniable. Take for instance scars or discoloration. However, South Carolina law requires that injured people also be allowed compensation for less obvious, though equally detrimental, losses. Therefore, you may receive compensation for all future medical costs, decreased earning potential, mental anguish, and a number of other hardships. Anything less than fair and full compensation violates South Carolina law and should not be accepted.

3. Burn injury cases are complex.

It may seem obvious that when someone in our community is injured or killed in a fire, the people who contributed to the fire should pay fair compensation. While this is a simple truth, these are not simple cases. Accidents related to fires, chemical spills, and unsafe products can result in very complex legal issues. There may be questions over who is to blame, whether future medical treatment is actually required, and whether the victim in any way contributed to the accident. Therefore, it is often in a victim or surviving family’s best interest to consult with an attorney before talking with insurance companies, signing authorization forms, or discussing settlement figures. In short, talking to the insurance company after a burn accident may only cause more harm.

To schedule a free consultation or request free copies of my books, call my Columbia, SC office today at (803) 790-2800.